Cross Keys Studio

The History of the Studio

The Birth of the Studio

My life-long love affair of woodworking and music came together to breathe life into a beautiful structure across the driveway from my house now known as Cross Keys Studio.  Watch the video below to see the structure rise from ground level- in just over 6 days! Many thanks to Gaius Hennin and the crew from the Shelter Institute in Woolwich, ME.  Not only did the design the building but they also showed up after we had cut all of the timbers and assembled it for us.  This was only the second time they had assembled a student-cut building since they began doing this in 1974 so I’m quite honored that they trusted my team.

Speaking of teams, I have to thank, Mac McCumsey, Vinnie King, my mother-in-law, Elsie Janthey, my two brothers, Tom and Carl, my daughters, Joan and Anna, and especially my wife Chris.  Without these folks I couldn’t have completed this dream and begun capturing the musical sounds from the Shenandoah Valley.

The construction phase o fthe woodshop and studio building was captured by my friend and videographer, John Woody – see IEDITHD for more details.  He was at the site everyday and captured the spirit of the building rising up from the ground – in early January no less.  His video, Post and Beam Workshop and Recording Studio, also includes a bit of the finish work inside the structure.

World-Class Recording

The recording studio is working hard these days.  Recent activities include two new upcoming cd releases from my band, The Highlander Sting Band and a new release from Bob Driver – his second cd project here at the studio.  Each of these projects has made great use of our collection of Peluso mics as well as the Grace and Chandler preamps.

Trudy Cole and Bob Driver came by the studio to add a duet to the collection of tunes that Bob and I have been recording for his second cd with us here at BeARcade Music Productions. They recorded a wonderful version of “How Can You Have The Blues”

 

 

 

The latest  addition to the control room will be a Switchcraft patch bay – hand assemled/soldered by yours truly and Dan Easley.  There are close to 1000 solder joints in all of the wires into and out of the 96 channels of connectivity.  We’ve nearly finished the first patch bay and are already considering doing a second one.  Every input will be able to quickly connect to any output in the studio giving us great flexibility to use all of our great equipment.

 

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